Proposal for Lower Point Vicente Park Proposal for Lower Point Vicente Park, We would like to present to you the Los Serenos de Point Vicente Docents’ proposal for the Outdoor Living History Museum as a plan to complete the long-awaited new Point Vicente Interpretive Center, The Outdoor Living History Museum concept has been our vision for many years. Prior to the Center’s closure, members of Los Serenos toured children through these quiet surroundings, reflecting on the history and solitude of this breathtaking site. As an improvement of our earlier tours, this outdoor educational area will allow visitors the opportunity to experience life as it was throughout the centuries on this very peninsula. Walk through an Indian gathering area A Proposal Presented by the Docents of Los Serenos de Point Vicente
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Note: The following is a conceptual proposal for Lower Point Vicente Park that has been put forward for consideration by the Los Serenos de Point Vicente Docents. This, as well as other proposals for the site, are currently under consideration by the City.

Proposal for Lower Point Vicente Park

The Point Vicente Outdoor Living History Museum Presented by the docents of Los Serenos de Point Vicente

1. Proposal

    We would like to present to you the Los Serenos de Point Vicente Docents’ proposal for the Outdoor Living History Museum as a plan to complete the long-awaited new Point Vicente Interpretive Center.  

2. Triangle

    This unique piece of land that we call the "educational triangle," encompassing the area surrounding the Interpretive Center from PV Drive West to the ocean, will be an outdoor nature laboratory. As an extension of the Interpretive Center, this spot is the ONLY place where this plan will work.  

3. Concept

    The Outdoor Living History Museum concept has been our vision for many years. Prior to the Center’s closure, members of Los Serenos toured children through these quiet surroundings, reflecting on the history and solitude of this breathtaking site. As an improvement of our earlier tours, this outdoor educational area will allow visitors the opportunity to experience life as it was throughout the centuries on this very peninsula. Walk through an Indian gathering area. Participate in an archeological "find". Watch the farmers practice "dry farming" as they have done for decades – on this very peninsula! Wander the trails winding through natural habitat; catch a glimpse of a bird overhead or an animal scurrying out of sight. Touch the rocks and fossils and crystals, which have been part of the peninsula for millions of years.

4.PVIC

    The beautiful new Point Vicente Interpretive Center – the core, the heartbeat, the JEWEL OF THE PENINSULA! The expanded building will be a center of learning for children and adults, as well as docents. This unique museum experience will be carried outside as one walks through 5 basic areas.

5. Farm

    The history of the Japanese farmers in this area goes back to the early 1900’s, and they have continuously farmed here since then. At one time, the majority of the children in the Malaga Cove school were Japanese. This picture of the farmers was taken here in the 1930’s. To support the continuation of farming here is consistent with the Rancho Palos Verdes Master Plan. The farm presently at Pt. Vicente is one of the last original farm on the hill. Mr. Hatano, the farmer, has indicated that he would assist us in learning about dry farming methods, so that this important heritage can be shared with our school tours and other visitors. The experiences here could include seasonal festivals such as, "From Field to Table". We would show the children how food is grown and harvested, prepared and enjoyed. We could include Japanese and Indian heritage displays, and arts and crafts.  

6. Dig

    The next component of the Living History Museum is the "Archaeological Dig." This would be a clean pit of sand salted with fossils, bones, shells, and replica "artifacts" supplied by the docents, and maybe even created by the children themselves. They’d learn how to dig and explore, discover and evaluate their findings.

    Dr. Bruce Zuckerman from the USC Archeology Dept. has indicated an interest in advising and assisting us with this area.

7. Indian

From there we can wander through the native habitat and into the Indian Gathering Area, which will be set apart and buffered on all sides by native plants and bushes so the children can experience what it was like centuries ago to be an Indian child right here on the Peninsula: only the sounds of the animals and birds and the waves from the shores below; no cars, no buildings other than the kishes that you see in this picture – the grass huts not much taller than the people themselves. We’ll teach them Indian games and crafts, and how plants were used for food and medicines. Jacob Gutierrez , a Tongva Indian, will advise us in planning this area. And John Olguin, Director Emeritus of the Cabrillo Aquarium and "Mr. Living History" himself, is looking forward to helping us.

8. Geology

One of the most remarkable features of the Peninsula is its geology. People from around the world come here to study the 13 visible terraces and all they reveal. This area will have examples to touch and see: basalt, intrusion rock (such as this example in the picture), crystals, and fossils. We hope to integrate the PV School District’s 6th grade Geology Studies with a visit here, as a preview to the hike program in the Forrestal Nature Preserve that our Docents conduct with them each year.  

9. Garden

Here we can wander through a native plant garden and natural habitat area, thanks to the California Native Plant Society and a grant from the Palos Verdes Sunset Rotary Club. The garden will be planned and planted by the CA Native Plant Society, assisted by the Palos Verdes Sunset Rotary members. The plants will be labeled so the visitor can then wander throughout the rest of the park and learn to identify them in a natural setting. John Nieto, a Docent and the Land Conservancy Educational Director, will also be on hand to help with the plant education. We also plan to have periodic lectures by native plant experts, which will be open to the public.  

10.Trails

The trails will connect with Upper Pt. Vicente, wander past all these natural history components, throughout native habitat, joining the Pacific Coast Trail along the ocean, and connecting on the left to Ocean Front Estates, and on the right eventually all the way to San Pedro. The grassy area will be a place for picnics, family gatherings, community activities such as "Shakespeare By The Sea," relaxing…and solitude. And of course, we will once again have whale watching from this ideal site during migration season, from either cliff side or the outdoor amphitheatre. Imagine: all of these historical elements which are tied to the land in this one area, all connected to the Point Vicente Interpretive Center. There is no location other than Lower Pt. Vicente that would suit this Outdoor History Museum!

11.Gathering Area

All of these areas deserve much more attention, but let’s focus on just one. The Tongva Indians who actually lived on the Peninsula are dwindling in number. There are only about 300 left. We hope that our Tongva Gathering Area will be an attraction to those who want to learn more about our native people. We will teach children and adults alike about their lives, their homes and customs, and how they lived off the land.  

12. Festival

We hope to attract Indian Festivals such as this one. We will give visitors the experience of their music, their crafts, and their heritage.

 

SUMMARY
This integrated Living History Museum will be a resource, a hands-on learning center, an outdoor extension of the beautiful new Point Vicente Interpretive Center. It will be a Historical walk back in time of life right here. What a great place to visit for the 10,000 children of the peninsula, their parents and grandparents, as well as school children from throughout the LA area, and visitors from around the world. History demands that we be faithful to the story of our land. This can ONLY happen here. And with it, the peaceful, quiet seaside ambiance in Lower Pt. Vicente Park will continue to make this spot "The JEWEL of the Peninsula."  Committee: Vic Quirarte, President Joan Barry, Past President Bill Lama, Vice-President Bob Barry, Docent Betty Riedman, Volunteer