FORRESTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN Steering Committee’s review of the Management Plan. FORRESTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN Steering Committee’s review of the Management Plan.

The following table lists the issues or concerns raised by the public and some Steering Committee members during the Committee’s review of the Management Plan. The Table categorizes the issues/concerns by topic and provides a respective response to each specific issue/concerm, as well as an alternative action for consideration by the City Council. Furthermore, since the Council adopted the Trails Network Plan at its December 4, 2004 meeting, the Table includes an "Action Column" that lists whether the concern has been addressed or not addressed.

TOPIC

ISSUE / CONCERN

SUBMITTED BY

RESPONSE

ALTERNATIVE

COUNCIL ACTION

Trails

The proposed Trails Network Plan does not include a trail along the easterly ridge from the Quarry Bowl to the area near the radar towers. The Christo Que Viento A16 trail (formerly known as the Ganado trail) reaches the same point via the western ridge and provides access from Coolheights Drive.

Ralph Ortolano, Sr.; Ralph Ortolano, Jr., and individuals residing on Coolheights Drive.

On December 16, 2003, the City Council, after hiking the trail in question, determined not to include the requested trail route on the easterly ridge because it traversed private property and would interfere in the construction of the proposed residence. Furthermore, the Council felt that requiring another easement from the property owner would be overly burdensome because the property owner had already deeded 51.6% percent of his lot to the City.

Therefore, when this issue was raised again, the Steering Committee declined to readdress the request because of the City Council’s decision on December 16, 2003. However, the Steering Committee agreed to relocate the vista point from the easterly ridge to an equivalent elevation along the Christo Que Viento (A16) trail route.

To include the easterly ridge as part of the Trails Network Plan, the City would have to acquire an access easement from the property owner using eminent domain, or otherwise locate a trail route and construct a new trail (requiring grading) within the open space conservation easement that the property owner deeded to the City. A new trail located within the conservation easement will require mitigation resulting from habitat impacts.

Aside from the Council’s Decision on December 16, 2003, this matter was addressed by the Council at its December 4, 2004 meeting with the adoption of the Trails Network Plan.

Trails

The proposed Trails Network Plan does not permit horses along Forrestal Drive (on trail segment L5) within the Preserve.

Equestrian community, RPV Q- Committee, PVP Horsemens Association, and community individuals

From the onset of the Steering Committee’s tenure, numerous public comments were submitted to the Committee regarding equestrian uses within the Preserve. Specifically, the Ladera Linda HOA and its residents have stated their desire to keep horses off the streets and trails neighboring their tract.

In response, the Steering Committee developed a Plan that strikes a balance between the two interest groups. The Plan allows pedestrian and bicycle uses, but not equestrian uses, along Forrestal Drive (L5) because of its close proximity to the neighboring residential area. However, equestrian use will be permitted along Intrepid Drive (L6) and the Fossil Hill area. Moreover, of the 21 total trails within the Preserve, 12 trails are designated as multipurpose (pedestrian, equestrian, and bicycle).

The City Council may wish to reconsider the Steering Committee’s recommendation by allowing multipurpose uses along Forrestal Drive (L5). Such a change will require the Trails Network Plan and the Management Plan to be amended accordingly.

This concern was addressed by the Council at its December 4, 2004 meeting with the adoption of the Trails Network Plan.

Equestrian use is now permitted along the upper portion of Forrestal Drive (L5), west of the Crystal Trail (L11) junction.

Trails

The Loop Trail should be located as shown in the Conceptual Trails Plan, along Forrestal Drive and around the Quarry Bowl, because that brings the trail closest to the access points.

Sunshine

According to the City’s Conceptual Trails Plan (CTP), the Loop Trail should be designated as multipurpose.

In response to public comments, specifically the residents of the Ladera Linda HOA and the Mediterrania HOA, that equestrian uses should not be allowed on the trails or streets in close proximity to the neighboring residences, the Committee felt that the Loop Trail should be designated as the route furthest away from the residential neighborhoods. As such, the Committee agreed to re-designate the Loop Trail as the upper trail within the Preserve. In any case, the Council’s action will replace the language in the CTP.

The City Council may wish to reconsider the Steering Committee’s recommendation by re-designating the Loop Trail to be consistent with the current Conceptual Trails Plan.

The Council, at its December 4, 2004 meeting, addressed this matter with the adoption of the Trails Network Plan. The Loop Trail is designated as the upper trails within the Preserve.

Trails

Bicycles should not be allowed on the trails within the Preserve because of potential impacts to the habitat.

California Native Plant Society, Audubon Club, Sierra Club, Community Individuals

The original Management Plan did not allow bicycle use within the Preserve because the Committee had been informed that bicycle use on City parkland was prohibited. However, members of the Steering Committee recognized that the CTP calls for the consideration of bicycle use on many of the trails, and that the Preserve has always been used by bicyclists and that bicycle use is a highly desired use by the public. Therefore, rather than prohibiting bicycle use, the Committee felt it would be more beneficial to allow controlled bicycle use .

At the same time, a community organization, referred to as Concerned Off-Road Bicyclists Association (CORBA), approached the Committee with the concept of an Educational Trails Unit (ETU) that would use volunteers to educate bicyclists to be responsible trail users, by having them use the official trails designated for bicycle use and to respect the habitat for a net improvement to the Preserve's habitat. The concept of an ETU has been expanded to include the equestrian community. It should be noted that the ETU will be conducted by volunteers and overseen by the City and the PVPLC.

In addition to the ETU, the Plan sets up a monitoring program to evaluate the condition of the trails and the related programs on a regular basis. There will be a review at six months, and on an annual basis thereafter.

The City Council may wish to re-consider the Steering Committee’s recommendation by further limiting or prohibiting bicycle use within the Preserve.

This matter was addressed by the Council at its December 4, 2004 meeting with the adoption of the Trails Network Plan.

As adopted, bicycles are permitted along Forrestal Drive (L5) and the majority of the trails located on Fossil Hill. At this time, bicycle use is not permitted on the upper trails within the Preserve, with the exception of City authorized rides.

Trails

In terms of trail uses, what is defined as passive recreational?

Community Members

There is considerable debate in the recreation/ preservation community regarding the definition of active versus passive recreation uses.

According to the City’s General Plan, passive recreation facilities are mostly unstructured to allow natural ecosystems to function with the least amount of human disturbance.

The premise behind the proposed Trails Network Plan is that trails by nature should be considered passive, whether involving hiking, riding, or biking. The crossover to an active use occurs when a facility, such as a field, is provided to accommodate an activity, such as an equestrian facility for equestrian uses or a bike fun zone for bicyclists.

The Council may wish to officially define passive and active recreational uses within the context of the Management Plan, by citing specific activities under each category.

This matter was addressed by the Council at its December 4, 2004 meeting with the adoption of the Trails Network Plan.

Trails

View Point No. 3 should not be permitted because of potential impacts to habitat and sensitive plant species.

Project Biologist, individual

View Point No. 3 is located along the Mariposa Trail (A15). This location was selected by the Committee as a view point because its setting and scenic vista naturally makes this spot a viewing point. In terms of habitat protection, recognizing that the view point is near sensitive species, the Committee is recommending to install fencing that will discourage the public from traveling beyond the vista point and signs to educate the public of the nearby sensitive environment. Additionally, a bench, made from natural materials (such as stones), will be installed to enhance the viewing experience.

The Council may wish to re-consider the Steering Committee’s recommendation by removing Vista Point No. 3 from the Trails Network Plan. In the event this occurs, measures will have to be considered to prevent the public from naturally stopping at this point, such as the installation of fencing, signs, and plantings.

This concern was addressed by the Council at its December 4, 2004 meeting with the adoption of the Trails Network Plan.

Trails

The Dauntless Trail (A12) should not be included because improving it will cause damage to sensitive habitat.

Project Biologist

The location of the proposed Dauntless Trail (A12) currently consists of three parallel trails that connect Fossil Hill to the fire road that leads to Portuguese Bend. The Committee felt that since three trails currently exist and there is evidence that the trails are currently being used, closing this trail route would be unrealistic and more difficult to access the Fossil Hill portion of the property from Portuguese Bend. Therefore, the Committee recommends improving the trail so that rather than having three separate trails going to the same destination, there is one officially designated trail. Furthermore, by including this trail within the Plan, it provides a loop around the lower portion of the Fossil Hill area for multiple uses originating from Portuguese Bend.

The Council may wish to re-consider the Steering Committee’s recommendation by eliminating the Dauntless Trail (A12) from the Trails Network Plan. In such a case, measures will have to be taken to curtail the use of this route and redirect the public to a different trail route.

This concern was addressed by the Council at its December 4, 2004 meeting with the adoption of the Trails Network Plan.

Trails

The Trails Network Plan should be revised to reflect the alternative Trails Plan submitted by the Sierra Club that limits equestrian and bicycle uses to minimize potential impacts to the surrounding environment

Sierra Club and Community Members

The Sierra Club presented the Steering Committee with an alternative Trails Network Plan that would limit the use of bicycles to the trails located along Forrestal Drive, Intrepid Drive, and the Fossil Hill Area. Their rational for proposing this alternative is that bicycle use on the remaining trails within the Preserve may potentially impact the plants, animals, and habitat, cause soil erosion and trail damage, disturb other trail users, and/or result in a dangerous situation for other trail users.

The Steering Committee’s recommendation is based on public input, including, but not limited to, the presentation by the Sierra Club, the Horsemen’s Association, CORBA, and the questionnaire results. The recommended Trails Network Plan has been developed to strike a balance between each of the user groups and interest groups. It should be noted that the Plan requires the property to be monitored on an on-going basis to determine the effectiveness of the Trails Network Plan and the condition of the Preserve. In the event changes are warranted, the Trails Network Plan can be modified.

The Council, after reviewing the Sierra Club’s proposed alternative to the Steering Committee’s recommended Trails Network Plan, may wish to amend the Plan to reflect some or all of the Sierra Club’s proposed trail routes and uses.

This matter was addressed by the Council at its December 4, 2004 meeting with the adoption of the Trails Network Plan.

As adopted, the Trails Network Plan allows bicycles along Forrestal Drive (L5) and the majority of the trails located on Fossil Hill. At this time, bicycle use is not permitted on the upper trails within the Preserve, with the exception of City authorized rides

Trails

According to the Trails Network Plan, Trail L16 (Red Tail) should be reconfigured to merge with the middle section of Trail A13 (Canyon View) resulting in the removal of Trail L16.

Sierra Club, some Committee Members, and Community Individuals

The routes selected by the Steering Committee for both the Red Tail (L16) and the Canyon View (A13) trails were based on the existing pathways and the logical pathways a trail user would follow when traversing this area of the Preserve. In addition, these trails were requested by the public through the trails survey. Although improvements are required along the Canyon View (A13) trail route, impacts to habitat would be minimal, if any, and any attempt to close this route may prove to be unrealistic because of the natural inclination to travel these pathways.

The Council may wish to re-consider the Steering Committee’s recommendation by reconfiguring the route of the Canyon View Trail (A13). In such a case, measures will have to be taken to redirect the public to the reconfigured trail route.

This matter was addressed by the Council at its December 4, 2004 meeting with the adoption of the Trails Network Plan.

 

Trails

What type of standards are going to be used to address safety concerns on trails designated for multiple uses (pedestrians, equestrians, and bicycles)?

Sierra Club, CNPS, some Committee Members, Ladera Linda HOA, and Community Individuals

In order to better understand the concept of trail standards, the Steering Committee consulted with other regional parks and preserves, conducted a trails workshop consisting of panelists of trail experts, and researched the internet. After all its research efforts, the Committee concluded that there are no generally accepted trail standards. Therefore, since the trails have historically been used by various user groups without significant conflicts that have been reported to the City or the Sheriff’s Department (it should be noted that the questionnaire results indicate that past conflicts on the trails were resolved by the individuals), the Committee concluded that it was not feasible to set design standards for the existing trails. Furthermore, the Committee is recommending that trail routes, uses, and the condition of the Preserve to be monitored, as spelled out in the Management Plan, to evaluate the effectiveness of the Plan. The monitoring results will be reported in six months and annually thereafter.

The City Council may wish to include trail standards for existing trails within the context of the Management Plan. To do this, Staff and the Steering Committee would need to develop specific standards for specific trails. It should also be noted that developing trail standards (i.e. minimum width) will most likely result in widening the existing trails, which will result in environmental impacts to the habitat or the elimination of a trail user group(s).

This concern has not been addressed by the Council and is a part of Staff Recommendation No. 1.

Trails

How will the public know where the officially designated trails are within the Preserve and what the uses are?

Community Individuals

In terms of the Preserve, signs are considered a valuable tool in educating and informing the public of the sensitive condition of the site and the official trail routes and uses. As such, the Committee is recommending the immediate installation of Carsonite (fiberglass) signs, that indicate the trail name and the permitted uses. Directional signs will also be installed to guide the public through the Preserve.

These signs are similar to the signs used and approved by the City Council at Ocean Trails.

The Council may wish to modify the material type or size of the informational signs used throughout the Preserve.

This concern has not been addressed by the Council and is a part of Staff Recommendation No. 1.

Trails

What method will be used to monitor activities and the condition of the Preserve?

Community Individuals, Trail User Groups

Chapter 7 and Appendix F of the Management Plan recommends the use of a monitoring program to evaluate the condition of the Preserve, and the trail routes and uses. The Committee is recommending a six-month trial period for the current proposal, with annual reviews thereafter. The monitoring protocol would consist of monthly photographs and inspections of trails, reporting of the volunteer hours donated to educate the public about the trails, a yearly public meeting, and a form for preserve users to provide feedback on their experience. A report on the components of the monitoring will be submitted to the City Council for review as part of the Annual Report submitted by the PVPLC.

The monitoring protocol provides the City with up-to-date information regarding the condition of the trails and the effectiveness of the Management Plan. The Monitoring Program combined with the Trails Status Report, are valuable tools in managing the Preserve and determining whether modifications are warranted.

If desired, the Council may wish to expand, contract, or modify the Managing protocol, as stated in Chapter 7 and Appendix F of the Management Plan.

This concern has not been addressed by the Council and is a part of Staff Recommendation No. 1.

Trails

Will you be closing trails, and if so, how will you do it?

Community Individuals

The Steering Committee is recommending that some unsafe and some duplicate and/or "braided" trails be closed. In order to properly close a trail for habitat restoration, the recommendation is to use signs that state "the area is closed for habitat restoration purposes" and to install directional signs that will identify the location of the designated trail route. In addition to signs, vegetation, such as cactus and stones, can be installed to discourage and redirect a trail user from entering a restoration area.

The Council may direct the Committee to not close any trails or direct the Committee to only close trail routes to a specific user group.

 

The designation of trails was addressed by the Council at its December 4, 2004 meeting with the adoption of the Trails Network Plan. The tools used to physically close trails is a matter to be addressed as part of Staff Recommendation No. 1

Trails

Once the trail improvements are completed, as identified at the December 4, 2004 City Council meeting, will the trails that currently prohibit bicycle use be designated as multi-purpose

CORBA -PV

At the December 4th meeting, the Council identified specific trail routes as being potentially unsafe for multiple uses (pedestrians, equestrians and bicycles) because of their current condition. Understanding that these trail routes have been used for years by multiple user groups, the Council felt that the official City trail maps should err on the side of public safety rather than historic use. However, the Council also recognized that the trail routes identified as being unsafe for multiple user groups at the present time could be repaired to re-introduce multiple uses at a later time, provided that the trail improvements can sustain such uses.

Moreover, the Council agreed to review the matter regarding trail uses within the Trails Network Plan at the 6-month review period.

Although the Trails Network Plan was adopted by the Council at its December 4th meeting, the Council may wish to reconsider, modify, or reiterate its December 4th decision as part of Staff Recommendation No. 1.

This concern was raised after the December 4th Council Meeting. Therefore, although this matter has already been addressed by the City Council, the Council may wish to discuss this concern as part of Staff Recommendation No. 1.

Enforcement

How will the City enforce the Management Plan, specifically making sure the public adheres to the officially designated trail routes and trail uses?

Community Members and Organized User Groups

The City’s Municipal Code (see section 12.16.080) currently regulates the use of horses on City parkland so that riding occurs on officially designated trails. Since bicycles are officially being recognized on the Preserve, the Steering Committee is recommending that the City Council consider amending the Ordinance so that bicycles are regulated similarly to horses. Codifying language to regulate bicycle use will allow the Sheriff to warn or cite violators of the Municipal Code. The recommended code amendment language is stated in the December 4, 2004 City Council Staff Report.

The Council may wish to prohibit bicycle use within the Preserve, thereby eliminating the need for a code amendment. Otherwise, the Council may decide not to regulate bicycles similarly to horses because they are not similar uses, and decline the Committee’s recommendation to initiate code amendment proceedings.

This concern has not been addressed by the Council and is a part of Staff Recommendation No. 2.

Enforcement

How will the City enforce its Municipal Code and Ordinances within the Preserve?

Community Members and Organized User Groups

The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department is able to enforce the Municipal Code and cite violators accordingly. Since the Committee is recommending the Council adopt a new ordinance that will regulate bicycle and equestrian use similarly, the Sheriff will be able to enforce the ordinance. Furthermore, the Sheriff’s department has indicated it has resources to randomly patrol the Preserve and has recently acquired off-road motorbikes, donated by American Honda, that can be used to patrol the Preserve. At this time, two deputies have been certified to use the off-road motorbikes. Their goal is to have six trained deputies on hand and to utilize the CORE and Reserve Deputies.

In addition to the Sheriff’s role, the concept of an Educational Trails Unit (ETU) is being introduced by CORBA and assisted by the PVP Horsemen’s Association. The ETU will use volunteers to educate the users of the Preserve on how to be responsible trail users, referring to the Municipal Code and the Management Plan as an enforcement and educational tool.

The Council may wish to expand, contract, or modify the use of enforcement at Forrestal.

The Council is being asked to review a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), submitted by CORBA, regarding the establishment and implementation of the Educational Trails Unit. If deemed acceptable, the Council can direct Staff to execute the MOU. Otherwise, if deemed unacceptable, provide Staff with further direction or reject the volunteer concept entirely.

This concern has not been addressed by the Council and is a part of Staff Recommendation Nos. 2 and 3.

Street Uses

Are horses and horse trailers allowed on Forrestal Drive and Intrepid Drive within the Preserve?

Community Members, Ladera Linda HOA Representatives, Equestrian Community and the City’s Equestrian Committee

The current Management Plan allows equestrian uses on the Forrestal and Intrepid trail segments. However, as proposed, the Steering Committee is recommending that the Forrestal trail segment of the Preserve not allow equestrian uses because of its close proximity to the neighboring residential tract. Notwithstanding, a portion of Forrestal Drive is a publicly dedicated street and pursuant to the California Vehicle Code, horses and horse trailers are permitted on the street.

In order to regulate the use of horse trailers on Forrestal Drive within the Preserve, the City will have to establish parking restrictions through the adoption of an ordinance.

The Council may wish to expand the permitted equestrian trail routes to include Forrestal Drive for equestrian use.

As for the street, per the California Vehicle Code, horses are permitted on public streets. If the Council decides to restrict horses on Forrestal Drive, the Council may consider vacating the street to a driveway so that the Vehicle Code would not apply in terms of allowing equestrian uses, as specified in the Management Plan.

The Council addressed this matter at its December 4, 2004 meeting with the adoption of the Trails Network Plan.

As adopted, the Trails Network Plan allows equestrian use along the upper portion of Forrestal Drive (L5), west of the Crystal Trail (L11) junction.

Street Uses

Can the City regulate the parking of horse trailers on the streets within the Preserve?

Community Members, Ladera Linda HOA Representatives, Equestrian Community and the City’s Equestrian Committee

At this time, the streets within the Forrestal Preserve are not regulated in terms of parking. In other words, no parking restrictions exist.

Notwithstanding, according to the City Attorney, the City can regulate or prevent the parking of vehicles on its property, including the parking of vehicles on public streets, provided that certain procedures are followed.  If there were a driveway or parking lot on the property, the City could also prevent vehicles exceeding a certain length from parking on those areas, or it could prevent any vehicle with an attached trailer from parking on its property. 

The City Council may wish to regulate parking along Forrestal Drive and intrepid Drive within the Preserve. Such regulation may include, limiting the type or length of vehicle, posting time limits, or prohibiting parking.

The Council addressed this matter at its December 4, 2004 meeting with the adoption of the Trails Network Plan.

As adopted, trailers, with City authorization, may park beyond the entry gate along the upper portion of Forrestal Drive (L5) and along Intrepid Drive (L6).

Access Gate

What is the City’s policy for opening the gate at Forrestal Drive?

The entry gate at Forrestal Drive was installed nearly twenty years ago to prohibit illegal activities from occurring on the property. The City’s current policy states that the gate is to remain closed at all times unless a City authorized event requires the gate to be opened or the Palos Verdes Peninsula School District has a scheduled event, such as a soccer game.

The Council may wish to reconsider the current policy so that the gate would remain open during specific hours, such as during City park hours. In considering this alternative, the Council will need to address the parking of vehicles, parking beyond the permitted hours, and the enforcement of illegal or undesirable activities from occurring at the property.

The Council addressed this matter at its December 4, 2004 meeting with the adoption of the Trails Network Plan.

The entry gate may be opened for public access with City authorization.

Access Gate

Can the City install a gate on a street that blocks public access?

Community Members, Ladera Linda HOA Representatives, Equestrian Community and the City’s Equestrian Committee

If it is a dedicated public street, the City can permanently block all access, provided that certain procedures are followed, or it can vacate the public street.  However, the City cannot allow selective access onto a public street by opening the gate for some events but not others.  

The Council may wish to remove the gate so that the Preserve is always accessible by the public. In considering this alternative, the Council will need to address the parking of vehicles, the design of the street, and the enforcement of illegal or undesirable activities from occurring at the property.

The Council addressed this matter at its December 4, 2004 meeting with the adoption of the Trails Network Plan.

The entry gate may be opened for public access with City authorization.

Access Gate

Why can’t the City gate at Forrestal Drive remain open during City Park hours?

Steering Committee Members, Equestrian Committee Members, and Equestrian Community Members

The gate was installed nearly twenty years ago to address prohibited activities, such as motor biking and illegal dumping of construction material, from occurring on the property. For that reason, the City’s current policy requires the gate to remain closed unless a City authorized event requires the gate to be opened.

The Council may wish to reconsider the current policy so that the gate is opened during City park hours, which is one hour before sunrise and one hour after sunset. This alternative will require additional staff to manage the opening and closing of the gate on a daily basis, including weekends and holidays.

The Council addressed this matter at its December 4, 2004 meeting with the adoption of the Trails Network Plan.

The entry gate may be opened for public access with City authorization.

Access Gate

Can a sign be installed by the gate that posts when the gate is opened and how to retrieve your vehicle if the gate is closed?

Steering Committee Members

Based on the City’s current policy regarding the gate, at this time, a sign can be posted indicating that the gate is only opened for authorized events and that motorists may be locked in. It could state that motorists can retrieve unauthorized vehicles locked behind the gate by calling the Sheriff.

If the Council wishes to amend the current City policy regarding the gate to allow the gate to be opened during specific hours, a sign posting those hours can be installed. In the event the gate is designated to be opened during set hours, the Council will need to address how to handle vehicles parked after the posted hours.

The Council addressed this matter at its December 4, 2004 meeting with the adoption of the Trails Network Plan.

The entry gate may be opened for public access with City authorization.

Access Gate

Can the gate be reconfigured from a two-swing door to a one-swing door to address safety concerns relating to ingress and egress of vehicles?

Individuals residing in the Ladera Linda Tract

In response to this concerns, the City’s Public Works Department had the entry gate reconfigured several weeks ago to a one-swing door. Therefore, when the gate is opened the entire street is accessible for egress and ingress purposes.

The Council can direct Staff to reconfigure the gate back to its original configuration as a two-swing door, or opt to remove the gate entirely. Such a decision will make the Preserve accessible 24-hours a day and more accessible by vehicles.

The Council addressed this matter at its December 4, 2004 meeting with the adoption of the Trails Network Plan.

The entry gate may be opened for public access with City authorization.

Forrestal Steering Committee (Advisory Board)

How is one selected to serve on the Forrestal Steering Committee?

Community Members

The Forrestal Steering Committee serves in the capacity of an advisory board to the PVPLC and the City Council. The Steering Committee is proposed to be comprised of eleven (11) members (currently nine members serve on the Steering Committee), consisting of five (5) community members, three (3) City Staff members, and three (3) members from the PVPLC. Community members are to serve a two-year term. Chapter 3 of the Management Plan discusses in greater detail the selection process and composition of the Steering Committee and states that individuals will be nominated by the Executive Director of the PVPLC and the City Manager, to be approved and confirmed by the City Council. Organizations and groups with an interest in the Preserve will be asked to nominate members to the committee. The City and the PVPLC will make every effort to ensure that different points of view and user groups are represented on the Steering Committee.

In order to ensure that the Steering Committee operates as an advisory board to the City, Staff is recommending that the title of the Committee be changed to Forrestal Advisory Board. Staff’s recommended title change is reflected in the Management Agreement.

The Council may wish to modify the selection process, composition, and term limits of the Steering Committee.

 

This matter has not been addressed by the Council and is a part of Staff Recommendation No. 5.

Management Agreement

What role does the PVPLC maintain in the management of the City-owned Preserve.

Community Members

The Management Agreement defines the roles each entity is responsible for in the management of the City-owned Preserve. The current Management Agreement has been in effect since June 5, 2001 and is proposed to be amended to correspond to the proposed amendments to the Management Plan (see Chapter 3).

The Management Agreement, for consideration by the City Council, states that the PVPLC will jointly manage the Preserve with the City. The specific roles are called out in Section 2 of the Management Agreement. Furthermore, the Management Agreement is written so that the City maintains complete authority and access to the Property.

In the event the Council identifies concerns with the Management Agreement, the Council may wish to continue its review of the Agreement to an adjourned meeting or to appoint a sub-committee to meet with City Staff and representatives from the PVPLC to address the Council’s concerns.

This matter has not been addressed by the Council and is a part of Staff Recommendation No. 5.