SEPTEMBER 20, 2005 2005 ANNUAL REPORT ON THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE RANCHO PALOS VERDES GENERAL PLAN. SEPTEMBER 20, 2005 2005 ANNUAL REPORT ON THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE RANCHO PALOS VERDES GENERAL PLAN. SEPTEMBER 20, 2005 2005 ANNUAL REPORT ON THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE RANCHO PALOS VERDES GENERAL PLAN.

TO: HONORABLE MAYOR AND MEMBERS OF THE CITY COUNCIL

FROM: DIRECTOR OF PLANNING, BUILDING & CODE ENFORCEMENT

DATE: SEPTEMBER 20, 2005

SUBJECT: 2005 ANNUAL REPORT ON THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE RANCHO PALOS VERDES GENERAL PLAN.

Staff Coordinator: Kristen Sohn, Assistant Planner

RECOMMENDATION

Direct Staff to forward the City’s Annual Progress Report on the implementation of Rancho Palos Verdes General Plan for the 2004-2005 fiscal year to the State Governor’s Office of Planning and Research and to the Department of Housing and Community Development.

BACKGROUND

To assess each local government’s progress in implementing its General Plan, the California State Government Code requires that each city "provide an annual report to the legislative body on the status of the [general] plan and progress in its implementation." To meet this requirement, at the conclusion of each fiscal year, Staff compiles a list of all the land use decisions and other actions taken by the City in the course of the previous fiscal year and prepares a report to demonstrate how the various actions taken implement the goals and policies of the City’s General Plan. This report is then presented to the Planning Commission and the City Council for review before it is forwarded to the State.

On September 13, 2005, the Planning Commission reviewed and approved the attached 2005 Annual Report on the Implementation of the Rancho Palos Verdes General Plan, and directed Staff, via Minute Order, to forward the report to the City Council for review and consideration. The 2005 Annual Report is now being presented to the City Council.

DISCUSSION

Pursuant to Section 65400 of the State Government Code, Staff has prepared the City’s Annual Report regarding the status of the General Plan. The attached Annual Report illustrates the seven mandatory elements of the General Plan, and lists actions taken by the City during fiscal year 2004-2005 followed by a reference to the appropriate policy that is implemented by the action. The full text of each policy and goal implemented by the action is also included in the Annual Report. Staff believes that the City’s General Plan goals and policies continue to be implemented by actions taken by the City that have balanced community needs, property rights, and the health and welfare of the general public.

The Annual Report is attached for the City Council’s consideration. Upon acceptance by the City Council, the Annual Report will be subsequently delivered to both the State Governor’s Office of Planning and Research (OPR) and the Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD).

ALTERNATIVES

In addition to Staff’s recommendation, the following alternative is available for the City Council’s consideration:

  1. Direct Staff to modify the Report, and include additional information as directed by the City Council prior to delivering the Report to the Office of Planning and Research and the Department of Housing and Community Development.

Respectfully submitted,

Joel Rojas, AICP

Director of Planning, Building

and Code Enforcement

Reviewed by,

Les Evans

City Manager

Attachments

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this report is to comply with the requirements of Section 65400(b)(1) of the California State Government Code, which requires that an annual report be submitted to the legislative body, the Office of Planning and Research, and the Department of Housing and Community Development. The annual report must provide information regarding the status of the City’s General Plan and the progress on its implementation, including the progress in meeting its share of regional housing needs. The General Plan is a comprehensive planning document intended to guide development for the City.

State law requires that each adopted general plan address a minimum of seven issues (i.e., "elements"). Each element covers a certain aspect of the City’s growth and development, and must be consistent with the other elements. The seven mandatory elements include Land Use, Circulation, Housing, Conservation, Open Space, Noise, and Safety (including Seismic Safety). Additional optional elements may be included, as deemed appropriate by each city, depending on the unusual characteristics or development concerns of the jurisdiction. In reference to the City’s natural scenic vistas, the Rancho Palos Verdes General Plan includes an optional Scenic Highway element. Although each of the mandatory and optional elements are contained within the City’s document, the Rancho Palos Verdes General Plan addresses each element in broader categories, where the discussions regarding each mandatory element are integrated (and may overlap one another) throughout the document, as opposed to separate headings for each mandatory element.

The broader categories adopted in the City of Rancho Palos Verdes’ General Plan include the NATURAL ENVIRONMENT ELEMENT, which includes the mandatory Land Use, Conservation and Open Space elements; SOCIO/CULTURAL ELEMENT, which includes the mandatory Conservation and Open Space elements; and the URBAN ENVIRONMENT ELEMENT, which includes the mandatory Land Use, Circulation, Housing, Conservation and Open Space, Safety, Seismic Safety, and Noise elements, as well as the optional Scenic Highway element. In addition, the City’s General Plan includes a separate LAND USE PLAN ELEMENT that includes additional discussion regarding conservation, open space housing and seismic safety; and a FISCAL ELEMENT, which includes discussions regarding conservation, open space, and transportation (trails and bikeways). Finally, the City has an updated adopted HOUSING ELEMENT document, which was adopted by the City Council in 2001 and certified by the California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD).

The Annual Report individually illustrates each of the seven mandatory elements of the General Plan rather than the broader categories. Each element provides a list of actions taken by the City during fiscal year of July 1, 2004 through June 30, 2005, followed by a reference to the appropriate policy that is implemented by the action. The full text of each policy and goal implemented begins on page 15 of this report.

STATUS OF THE GENERAL PLAN

The City of Rancho Palos Verdes was incorporated in 1973 in response to high-density development proposals along the scenic coastal bluffs that help define the character of the Palos Verdes Peninsula. Subsequently, the Rancho Palos Verdes General Plan was prepared and adopted on June 26, 1975. The adopted goals are related to minimizing density along the coastal bluff areas, maintaining the rural character of the community, recognizing and managing unique resources, and identifying and protecting areas with significant development constrains such as sloped areas and areas of geologic instability. These goals of the City are the same today.

Although the General Plan has not been updated since it was adopted in 1975, a total of 20 amendments have been made since then, which are summarized on page 4. However, it is important to note that the City Council has authorized a comprehensive update to the General Plan. In May, 2002, the City Council began this process by forming a General Plan Update Steering Committee composed of various appointed City officials and other City residents. The purpose of the Steering Committee is to take a first look at the existing goals and policies and to make recommendations to the City Council as to what needs updating. To date, the Committee has met on average once a month, over the past 26 months. After over two years of work, on November 4, 2004, the General Plan Update Steering Committee completed their task of reviewing all of the existing goals and policies of the 1975 General Plan. At the December 21, 2005 meeting, the City Council directed Staff to proceed with factual updates within the General Plan for future review by the Planning Commission and City Council and disbanded the Committee.

The General Plan has been implemented through the City’s Development Code, which has been revised, with the latest revision in May 5, 2005.

Based on population figures from the U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000, the City’s population has grown by only 5,145 since incorporation 29 years ago. Further, the City’s single-family housing units have increased by only 241 units between 1990 and 2000, which demonstrates the consistency of development in the City with the low density and semi-rural character goals and policies contained in the General Plan.

In December 2000, the City Council approved a Draft Housing Element in accordance with State requirements, which was forwarded to the Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) for review and comment. After addressing HCD comments, on August 21, 2001, the City Council adopted the final Housing Element. In a September 20, 2001 letter from HCD, the City was notified that the Final Housing Element "meets the statutory requirements of State housing element law" and is thereby in full compliance with State Law. This is the first time since incorporation (1973) that the City has an adopted Housing Element that has been certified by HCD.

The actions taken by the City during the fiscal year of 2004 through 2005 are consistent with the goals and policies contained within the City’s General Plan. The City continues to implement these goals and policies with decisions that balance community needs, property rights, and the health and welfare of the general public. The City Council, Planning Commission, and Staff continue to adhere to a vision for the City: to promote a well informed educated public with regard to City issues, problems, and services; a friendly responsive and competent City government; a safe community in which to live and work; a community with a sound economic base; a sound financial base to support and maintain vital City services; reductions to long-term public infrastructure costs within the City; and, a well maintained, balanced, and aesthetically pleasing community.

 

 

ADOPTED AMENDMENTS TO THE GENERAL PLAN

No.

Location

Description

Date

2

Tract 28750 – Peacock Ridge and Highridge Road

Change land use designation, from RS 2-4 DU/Acre to RS 4-6 DU/Acre

10-4-77

3

Coastal Zone

Establish regulations for development in the Coastal Zone

12-19-78

4

Tract 27832, Lots 1-8 Indian Valley Road

Change non-conforming land use from Single-family to Multi-family

9-5-78

5

  1. Ave. Esplendida & Ave. Classica
  2. Indian Valley Rd. & Armaga Spring Road

Change land use from Institutional to RS 2-4 DU/Acre on two former school sites

10-2-79

6

980 Silver Spur Road

Change land use from Commercial Office to Commercial Retail – remove Natural Overlay Control District

6-17-80

9

City Wide

Amend Housing Element Policies

9-23-81

10

Abalone Cove Shoreline Park

Change land use from Agriculture to Commercial Recreational & amend Coastal Plan to allow visitor serving uses in Coastal Zone

4-20-82

11

Paseo Del Mar at La Rotunda

Change land use from Institutional to RS 1 DU/Acre

9-7-82

12

(Golden Cove) PV Drive West at Hawthorne Blvd.

Change land use from Commercial Retail to RS 6-12 DU/Acre

8-7-84

13

Ladera Linda

32201 Forrestal Drive

Change land use from Institutional to RS 2-4 DU/Acre

9-7-82

14

Eastview Annexation

Amend General Plan to include policies/land use designations for Eastview Annexation

9-7-82

16

28041 Hawthorne Blvd.

Change land use designation from Res to Commercial

9-13-88

18

City Wide

Housing Element Update

9-18-90

20

City Wide

Amendment to the Housing Element

8-18-92

21

City Wide

Amend the General Plan to eliminate non-conforming auto service stations

11-3-93

22

City Wide

Amend the General Plan to incorporate the trail and bikeway policy from the Conceptual Trails Plan

11-6-91

23

3108, 6118, 6124 PV Drive South

Change land use designation from RS 2-4 DU/Acre to Commercial Office

3-4-97

24

5325 Ironwood and 5303 Bayridge

Change land use designation from RS 2-4 DU/Acre to RS 1 DU/5-Acres

3-17-98

29

City Wide

Housing Element Update

8-21-01

ZON2003-00036

6100 Palos Verdes Drive South

Change land use designation from Commercial Office (CO) to Residential

4-22-03

Notes: Amendment Nos. 1, 7, 17, 25, 26, and 28 were withdrawn

Amendment No. 8 was tabled in 1982 indefinitely

Amendment Nos. 15 and 19 were denied

Amendment No. 27 and 30 are incomplete

ACTIONS TAKEN THROUGH JUNE 30, 2005 TO IMPLEMENT GENERAL PLAN

Listed below are actions taken by the City of Rancho Palos Verdes towards implementation of the General Plan during the 2004-2005 fiscal year.

Although the City of Rancho Palos Verdes General Plan contains broader categories, each of the required elements is contained within these broad categories. Page one of this report indicates where each mandatory element is included within the City’s General Plan. As such, the following information is intended to specify and highlight each mandatory element, with a brief definition and the actions taken to implement the General Plan. The applicable policy number and page number where each policy can be found in the General Plan follows each action. However, a list of each policy as specified in the General Plan and referenced in this document, begins on Page 12 of this report.

By mandatory element, the following actions occurred:

  1. Land Use Element

The Land Use Element designates the general distribution and intensity of uses of the land for housing, businesses, industry, open space, natural resources, education, public buildings and grounds, waste disposal services, and other categories of public and private use. This element serves as the central framework for the entire plan and is intended to correlate all land uses into a set of coherent development policies.

  1. Circulation/Transportation Element

The Circulation/Transportation Element serves as an infrastructure plan and must be correlated with the Land Use Element. This element identifies the general location and extent of existing and proposed major thoroughfares, transportation routes, trails, terminals, and other local public utilities and facilities.

  1. Open Space Element, and
  2. Conservation Element

The Open Space Element is the plan for the "comprehensive and long range preservation and conservation of open space land…" (Govt. Code Section 65563). It must specify plans and measures for preserving open space for natural resources, for managing the production of resources, for outdoor recreation, and for public health and safety.

The Conservation Element addresses the conservation, development, and use of natural resources, including water, forests, soils, waterways, wildlife, and mineral deposits. It may consider issues such as flood control, water and air pollution, erosion, conversion of farmland, endangered species, and habitats.

  1. Safety/Seismic Safety Element

The Safety Element establishes policies and programs to protect the community from risks associated with seismic, geologic, floor, and fire hazards. The Safety Element may also contain a broader range of safety-related issues which may be locally relevant, such as the use, transport, and disposal of hazardous materials, power failure, and vehicle accidents, and policing. The Seismic Safety Element establishes policies and procedures to protect the community from risks associated with earthquake hazards. State Law requires this element with the Safety Element.

  1. Noise Element

The Noise Element identifies and appraises noise problems within the community and forms the basis for land use distribution, including current and projected noise level calculations for major noise sources.

  1. Housing Element

The Housing Element is a comprehensive assessment of current and projected housing needs for all segments of the community and all economic groups. This element identifies and analyzes existing and projected housing needs and contains a statement of goals, policies, quantified objectives, and scheduled programs for the preservation, improvement, and development of housing. In adopting this element, issues such as economic, environmental and fiscal factors, as well as community goals set forth in the General Plan must be considered.

SPECIFIC PLANS

A Specific Plan is a tool for implementation of the General Plan and contains development goals and guidelines for specified areas and/or districts within the City. To date, the City of Rancho Palos Verdes has adopted four Specific Plans, including the Coastal Specific Plan, which addresses land use and development within the City’s Coastal Zone (all land seaward of Palos Verdes Drive West and Palos Verdes Drive South), as well as three Specific Plan districts along the Western Avenue commercial corridor. During the Period of July 1, 2001 to June 31, 2002, Staff combined the three specific plans that govern Western Avenue, into one reference document, which is user-friendly. Since the text, issues, policies, and standards have not changed, a specific plan amendment was not required. Nonetheless, by Specific Plan District, the following actions occurred during fiscal year 2004-2005:

Coastal Specific Plan

Certified in 1981, the Rancho Palos Verdes Coastal Specific Plan provides specific development guidelines and standards for all land located seaward of Palos Verdes Drive West and Palos Verdes Drive South. The lands have been classified by Sub regions (1-8), with specific development criteria provided, based on the unique character of each Sub-region.

Specific Plan District No. II

This Specific Plan area includes properties located between 28821 – 28947 Western Avenue (southwest corner of Caddington Drive and Western Avenue) – The Terraces Shopping Center. Specific Plan No. II was adopted in 1985 by the City Council.

Specific Plan District No. III

This Specific Plan area includes properties located between 29505 – 29701 Western Avenue. Specific Plan No. III was adopted in 1986 by the City Council.

Specific Plan District No. IV

This Specific Plan area includes properties located between 29019 – 29421 Western Avenue. Specific Plan No. IV was adopted in 1987 by the City Council.

GOALS & POLICIES IMPLEMENTED DURING 2004-2005 FISCAL YEAR

Below is a summary list of the General Plan Policies and Goals, and relevant Specific Plan Policies that were implemented during the 2004-2005 fiscal year, as specified in the actions of the 2003-2004 Annual Report.

Land Use Element

Urban Environment Element – Housing Activity Policy No. 1, Page 78: Retain the present predominance of single family residences found throughout the community, while continuing to maintain the existing variety of housing types.

Urban Environment Element – Housing Activity Policy No. 2, Page 78: Require all new housing developed to include suitable and adequate landscaping, open space, and other design amenities to meet the community standards of environmental quality.

Urban Environment Element – Housing Activity Policy No. 3, Page 78: Encourage and assist in the maintenance and improvement of all existing residential neighborhoods so as to maintain optimum local standards of housing quality and design.

Urban Environment Element – Housing Activity Policy No. 4, Page 78: Prepare development codes with quality standards, but flexible new technology and techniques of building.

Urban Environment Element – Housing Activity Policy No. 5, Page 78: Support and assist in enforcement of "open housing" regulations to prohibit discrimination in the sale or rental of housing.

Urban Environment Element– Housing Activity Policy No. 10, Page 78: Require all developments which propose open space to be held in private ownership to provide legal guarantees to protect these areas from further development.

Urban Environment Element – Housing Activity Policy No. 11, Page 78: Control the alteration of natural terrain.

Urban Environment Element – Housing Activity Policy No. 12, Page 78: Encourage energy conservation in housing design.

Urban Environment Element – Housing Activity Policy No 13, Page 78: Require proposals for development of areas which impact corridor related views to analyzed the site conditions and address the preservation of such views.

Urban Environment Element – Housing Activity Policy No. 14, Page 78: Prohibit encroachment on existing scenic views reasonably expected by neighboring residents.

Urban Environment Element – Housing Activity Policy No. 15, Page 78: Enforce height controls to further lessen the possibility for view obstructions.

Urban Environment Element – Housing Activity Policy No. 16, Page 78: Require proposed housing to show how it ensures the existence of neighboring site privacy, while simultaneously providing privacy to the occupants of the proposed units.

Urban Environment Element – Housing Activity Policy No. 17, Page 78: Make an effort through zoning, cooperation with other governmental entities, and acquisition to preserve the rural and open character of the City.

Urban Environment Element – Housing Activity Policy No. 18, Page 78: Allow no further development involving human occupancy within the active landslide area.

Urban Environment Element – Institutional Activity Policy No. 1, Page 93: Locate schools on or near major arterials or collectors, and provide adequate parking and automobile access.

Urban Environment Element – Institutional Activity Policy No. 6, Page 93: Review the location and site design of future institutional uses to ensure their compatibility with adjacent sites.

Urban Environment Element – Recreational Activity Policy No. 1, Page 99: Provide access to all public recreational land.

Urban Environment Element – Institutional Activity Policy No. 4, Page 99: Establish ordinances to require builders and developers to provide lands and/or funds for acquisition and development of land for recreational use. These lands and/or funds shall be based on a standard of providing 4 acres of local parkland per 1000 population.

Urban Environment Element –Infrastructure Policy No. 8, Page 138: Require adequate landscaping or buffering techniques for all new and existing facilities and networks, in order to reduce the visual impact of many infrastructure facilities and networks.

Urban Environment Element Goal, page preceding Page 57: The City shall encourage the development of institutional facilities to serve the needs of its citizens.

Urban Environment Element Goal, page preceding Page 101: To ensure adequate public utilities and communication services to all residents, while maintaining the quality of the environment.

Circulation/Transportation Element

Socio-Cultural Element – Social Services Policy No. 2, Page 55: Act to enhance mobility within the neighborhood, mobility within the City, and on the Peninsula as a whole.

Urban Environment Element – Disposal/Recovery System Policy No. 4, Page 112: Require developers to install necessary flood control devices in order to mitigate downstream flood hazard induced by proposed upstream developments.

Urban Environment Element – Disposal/Recovery System Policy No. 8, Page 112: Require the installation of sewers in existing development if alternative sewerage systems endanger public health, safety and welfare.

Urban Environment Element –Transportation Systems Policy No. 4, Page 137: Encourage, together with other [entities], to improve public transportation on the Peninsula and to provide access to other destinations in the region.

Urban Environment Element –Transportation Systems Policy No. 5, Page 137: Explore the establishment of an independent bus system or contact for service with an independent municipal transportation agency.

Urban Environment Element – Noise Aspect Policy No. 1, Page 187: Mitigate impacts generated by steady state noise intrusion (e.g., land strip landscaping, site design).

Urban Environment Element – Noise Aspect Policy No. 6, Page 187: Control traffic flows of heavy construction vehicles en route to or from construction sites to minimize noise.

Urban Environment Element – Visual Aspect Policy No. 5, Page 192: Develop well located vista points to provide off-road areas where views may be enjoyed.

Urban Environment Element Goal, page preceding Page 101: It shall be the goal of the City to provide residents with a safe and efficient system of roads, trails and paths.

Urban Environment Element Goal, page preceding Page 101: It shall be the goal of the City to encourage the increased mobility of residents through the development of an adequate transportation system.

Open Space Element, and

Conservation Element

Natural Environment Element Policy No. 4, Page 45: Consider in more detail natural environment factors in subsequent factors in subsequent specific area studies as an integral part of these studies.

Natural Environment Element Policy No. 7, Page 45: Encourage study of and funding to preserve unusual flora and fauna.

Natural Environment Element Policy No. 14, Page 45: Maintain the existing natural vegetation of the City in its natural state to the maximum extent possible in all existing and proposed developments, to the extent commensurate with good fire protection policies and encourage the re-establishment of appropriate native plants.

Natural Environment Element Policy No. 15, Page 45: Require a master landscape plan for any proposed development showing the retention/enhancement of natural vegetation proposed, new complementing vegetation, and all efforts involving retention/enhancement/protection of hydrologic factors, vegetation and wildlife factors.

Social-Cultural Element – Social Services Policy No. 1, Page 55: Encourage the development and expansion of meaningful geographic groupings and sub community committees to act as a vehicle for improved communications with citizens, the City staff, and the City Council. Individuals should be encouraged to become involved in the community through interaction, communication and participation.

Social-Cultural Element – Social Services Policy No. 5, Page 55: Encourage the use of town meetings and forums within neighborhoods and citywide to address a variety of issues and subjects of community interest. Facilities for such events should be provided where possible, and annual citywide events should be encouraged.

Social-Cultural Element – Social Services Policy No. 8, Page 55: Develop recreational programs that will address the recreational needs of all citizens, both individually and in groups.

Social-Cultural Element – Social Services Policy No. 12, Page 55: Place special emphasis on the cultural, educational, and recreational needs of individuals, families, and the community and encourage the expansion of existing programs in these areas.

Urban Environment Element – Housing Activity Policy No. 2, Page 78: Require all new housing developed to include suitable and adequate landscaping, open space, and other design amenities to meet the community standards of environmental quality.

Urban Environment Element – Housing Activity Policy No. 10, Page 78: Require all developments that propose open space to be held in private ownership to provide legal guarantees to protect these areas from further development.

Urban Environment Element – Housing Activity Policy No. 17, Page 78: Make an effort through zoning, cooperation with other governmental entities, and acquisition to preserve the rural and open character of the City.

Urban Environment Element – Recreational Activity Policy No. 2, Page 99: Continue to sponsor recreation programs within the City considering the diversity of needs.

Urban Environment Element – Recreational Activity Policy No. 8, Page 99: Encourage local citizens groups to participate in the planning, development, and maintenance of recreation facilities to the extent possible.

Urban Environment Element - Recreational Activity Policy No. 11, Page 99: Encourage public use of institutional recreation facilities, where possible.

Urban Environment Element – Disposal/Recovery System Policy No. 1, Page 112: Take an active interest in waste management and recycling programs and offer assistance to groups attempting to offer solutions to the problem of waste.

Urban Environment Element –Transportation Systems Policy No. 6, Page 137: Design path and trail networks to reflect both a local and regional demand, while maintaining the unique character of the Peninsula.

Urban Environment Element –Transportation Systems Policy No. 7, Page 137: Require all path and trail networks to be in separate rights-of-way.

Urban Environment Element –Transportation Systems Policy No. 11, Page 137: Further investigate possible funding sources for acquisition, development and maintenance of paths and trails.

Safety/Seismic Safety Element

Natural Environment Element Policy No. 4, Page 44: Allow no further development involving any human occupancy within the active landslide area.

Urban Environment Element –Safety Policy No. 1, Page 175: Promote the education and awareness pertaining to all hazards which affect residents.

Urban Environment Element –Safety Policy No. 2, Page 175: Adopt and enforce building codes, ordinances, and regulations which contain design and construction standards based upon specified levels of risk and hazard.

Urban Environment Element –Safety Policy No. 3, Page 175: Encourage cooperation among adjacent communities to ensure back-up law enforcement assistance in emergency situations.

Urban Environment Element –Safety Policy No. 4, Page 175: Cooperate with the fire protection agency and water company to ensure adequate water flow capabilities throughout all areas of the City.

Urban Environment Element –Safety Policy No. 5, Page 175: Cooperate with the fire protection agency to determine the feasibility of utilizing the existing helicopter "pad" at the Nike Site for a water refueling location.

Urban Environment Element –Safety Policy No. 6, Page 175: Develop stringent site design and maintenance criteria for areas of high fire hazard potential.

Urban Environment Element –Safety Policy No. 10, Page 175: Ensure that local, County, State, and Federal health, safety, and sanitation laws are enforced.

Urban Environment Element –Safety Policy No. 11, Page 175: Ensure that adequate emergency treatment and transportation facilities are available to all areas of the city.

Urban Environment Element – Safety Policy No. 13, Page 175: Encourage the availability of paramedic rescue service.

Urban Environment Element – Safety Policy No. 14, Page 175: Be prepared to implement contingency plans to cope with a major disaster.

Urban Environment Element Goal, page preceding Page 101: It shall be the goal of the City to provide residents with a safe and efficient system of roads, trails and paths.

Noise Element

Urban Environment Element – Noise Aspects Policy No. 1, Page 187: Mitigate impacts generated by steady state noise intrusion (e.g., land strip landscaping, site design).

Urban Environment Element – Noise Aspects Policy No. 6, Page 187: Control traffic flows of heavy construction vehicles en route to or from construction sites to minimize noise.

Housing Element

Urban Environment Element Goal, page preceding Page 57: It shall be the goal of the City to encourage the development of housing in a manner which adequately serves the needs of all present and future residents of the community.

Urban Environment Element – Housing Activity Policy No. 1, Page 78: Retain the present predominance of single family residences found throughout the community, while continuing to maintain the existing variety of housing types.

Urban Environment Element – Housing Activity Policy No. 2, Page 78: Require all new housing developed to include suitable and adequate landscaping, open space, and other design amenities to meet the community standards of environmental quality.

Urban Environment Element – Housing Activity Policy No. 3, Page 78: Encourage and assist in the maintenance and improvement of all existing residential neighborhoods so as to maintain optimum local standards of housing quality and design.

Urban Environment Element – Housing Activity Policy No. 6, Page 78: Cooperate with County, State, and Federal agencies, monitoring all housing programs offered, and studying their desirability of implementation in the City.

Urban Environment Element – Housing Activity Policy No. 8, Page 78: Initiate strong code enforcement programs so that scattered housing problems are solved rapidly to prevent even small-area deterioration.

Specific Plans

Urban Environment Element – Housing Activity Policy No. 7, Page 85: Require adequate provisions be incorporated into commercial site design to reduce negative impacts on adjoining areas.

Policy No. 1, Page U-28: Encourage future residential development to provide recreational facilities to meet the needs of their residents.

Policy No. 2, Page U-28: Encourage new developments adjoining public trails to design internal trails to link with the public trails.

Policy No. 4, Page U-28: Require all parks to provide adequate parking within their boundaries to meet their projected carrying capacities.

#####

2004-2005 Annual Report Prepared by:

Kristen Sohn, Assistant Planner

Department of Planning, Building and Code Enforcement

City of Rancho Palos Verdes

Submitted for:

Governor’s Office of Planning and Research

And

Department of Housing and Community Development

State of California